The Marks of a Quality Catholic Education

Every Catholic homeschooler knows the marks of the church – One, holy, catholic and apostolic. We recite them in the Creed at Mass, and they remind us of the nature of our Church. In much the same way, Catholic homeschooling has marks and characteristics too. In keeping with our traditions regarding education, the marks of Catholic homeschooling are excellent, orderly, and Catholic, and each of these should in some way characterize our family learning…

Marriage, the Family, and Home Education

Home education means the teaching by the parents at home, by both parents. A father’s contribution to the home education of his children is indispensable…

Education in the Family

Cardinal Sanchez encouraged parents to educate their children in the Catholic Faith, as they are encouraged by the documents of the Second Vatican Council, which teaches not only that they are the primary educators of their children, but also that the Church is present in families through parents teaching their children…

Wisdom: The Fruit of True Education

In Lucretius’s famous words, “Nothing can come from nothing.” A hundred or a thousand or a million times zero equals zero. No person can think with nothing in his mind. A person cannot think with an empty mind that is not filled with substance. A mind requires food for thought. The purpose of a bona fide education is to fill the mind with the wholesome, nutritious food for thought that will allow the mind to think, to see the light of truth, and to possess wisdom—a wisdom that will protect a person from the craftiness of the world. Wisdom illuminates the unchanging truths about human nature and the human condition (“the way things are”), the first principles that underlie the structure of reality, the laws of Mother Nature, and divine truth…

Rome on Parental Rights in Religious Education

At this time in the history of Catholic home schooling, very few families have any problems with their parish in regard to the preparation for the reception of the sacraments. However, there are still occasional problems. One problem we sometimes hear is that the parish does not approve of certain books used by the parents, even when these books have an imprimatur, that is, a bishop’s approval of the books.