Book Reports

We receive frequent questions about book reports because many children do not like writing book reports. One main reason is that most children are handwriting their book reports and, when it is necessary to make changes or corrections, they don’t like rewriting the whole report. Students might be happier if they handwrite only their outline. The outline should be the most serious part of the book report because the student needs to think about what main points he wants to make, and which examples will prove the main points…

Book Reports

When I first enrolled my children in the program, over twenty years ago, we were told to pick a good book and have the child write a report following some general guidelines. The present assignment–to read a set book and write the report following a provided outline–is a walk in the park, comparatively speaking. I would like to answer some of the usual questions that are asked by Seton parents…

Book Reports

I live in Chicago, but last fall I spent some time at the Seton offices in Front Royal, Virginia. My trip was a terrific opportunity to speak to Seton counselors and find out from them exactly with which part of the Seton lesson plans parents have difficulties so I could tackle them in my column. Book reports seem to be right at the top of the list. I find that interesting because when I first enrolled my children in the program, almost twenty years ago, we were told to pick a good book and have the child write a report following some general guidelines. The present assignment—to read a given book and write the report following a provided outline—seems like a much simpler task.